Past Events

Growing New Zealand Alpine Plants

Wednesday 18th of August 2004, 05:20 PM (15 years ago)

Contact: Ian Radford | ian.radford@botany.otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 9065

A talk by David Lyttle. The New Zealand alpine flora contains a diverse assemblage of species many of which are desirable and challenging horticultural subjects. Unfortunately New Zealand alpines are often appreciated more overseas than in their own country. This talk will provide an introduction to the propagation of New Zealand alpine plants from seeds and cuttings and will discuss problems frequently encountered in their culture. At the NEW Zoology Benham Building, 346 Great King Street, behind the Zoology car park by the Captain Cook Hotel. Use the main entrance of the Benham Building to get in and go to the Benham Seminar Room, Rm. 215, 2nd floor. Please be prompt as we have to hold the door open.

Trip to Tavora Reserve (Bobby's Head), with Pat Mark

Sunday 25th of July 2004, 09:00 AM (15 years ago)

Contact: Pat Mark | (03) 476 3229

Trip to Tavora Reserve (Bobby's Head), with Pat Mark. Tavora Reserve is the site of a restoration project undertaken by the Yellow Eyed Penguin Trust, to return former grazing land, pine forest and patches of remnant vegetation back to native bush. This is both to provide nesting habitat for the Yellow Eyed Penguin, and to restore vegetation for its own sake. The Trust is keen that this is a working BSO field trip: they want us to test a trail guide that they have been developing for the Reserve, in addition to the normal compilation of species lists and any advice we can provide on restoration works. The Reserve provides a diverse array of botanical habitats, and can be divided into hillside, dune and wetland/riparian vegetation types. Of special interest are remnant Poa cita, Bulbinella augustifolia and a local speargrass Aciphylla glaucescens in the hillside zone; the cushion plant Scleranthus biflorus and sand convolvulus Calystegia soldanella associated with sand dunes; and stream edge plants including the salt tolerant Apium prostratum - native celery, Azolla filiculoides - red water fern, Cotula coronopifolia - bachelor's buttons, Leptinella dioica, Mimulus repens - saltmarsh musk, Shoenoplectus pungens - three square sedge, Sarcocornia quinqueflora - glasswort, Samolus repens - sea primrose, Selliera radicans and Puccinellia sp. - salt grass. The Trust has undertaken extensive plantings to try to reintroduce plants formally endemic to coastal hillsides, sand dunes and wetlands and welcomes feedback from the BSO on the restoration job they have done so far. Leave Botany car park at 9 AM Sunday and return mid to late afternoon. Pack lunch, water and protection from the sun, wind, rain and cold.

Pachymenia - a question of species

Wednesday 21st of July 2004, 05:20 PM (15 years ago)

Contact: Ian Radford | ian.radford@botany.otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 9065

A talk by Lisa Russell. The taxonomy of the New Zealand members of red algal genus Pachymenia J.Agardh (Halymeniaceae, Rhodophyta) has been contentious. Three New Zealand endemic species of are currently recognized: one prostrate species P. crassa and two foliose species P. laciniata and P. lusoria. As part of my PhD I have explored relationships between these New Zealand species, in particular between the intertidal species P. lusoria and P. laciniata in order to develop a clearer understanding of species boundaries. A multidisciplinary approach was undertaken combining molecular systematics and cell wall chemistry with more traditional approaches based on gross morphological characters. I will discuss here the results of these three approaches, firstly in relation to the New Zealand species of Pachymenia and secondly in relation to the generic boundaries between Pachymenia and a sister genus Aeodes. At the NEW Zoology Benham Building, 346 Great King Street, behind the Zoology car park by the Captain Cook Hotel. Use the main entrance of the Benham Building to get in and go to the Benham Seminar Room, Rm. 215, 2nd floor. Please be prompt as we have to hold the door open.

Oregon, Europe & Dunedin: Plants, Gardens & Seed

Wednesday 16th of June 2004, 05:20 PM (15 years ago)

Contact: Ian Radford | ian.radford@botany.otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 9065

A talk by Tom Myers, Botanical Services Officer, Dunedin Botanic Garden. Tom recently spent a year in Newport, Oregon where he did some work both gardening and as a marine science contractor, also taking time to visit State Parks and local Botanic Gardens, attending the American Association of Botanic Garden and Arboreta (AABGA) combined mid-west and Pacific region conference. In August-September he travelled to Europe with his partner, visiting Botanic Gardens at the Universities of Coimbra and Porto in Portugal, Bonn in Germany and additionally visiting the island of Texel in the Netherlands. In January this year Tom returned to his job in Dunedin. At the NEW Zoology Benham Building, 346 Great King Street, behind the Zoology car park by the Captain Cook Hotel. Use the main entrance of the Benham Building to get in and go to the Benham Seminar Room, Rm. 215, 2nd floor. Please be prompt as we have to hold the door open.

Moores Bush and cryptogam ID workshop

Saturday 12th of June 2004, 09:30 AM (15 years ago)

Contact: Allison Knight | alli_knight@hotmail.com | 027 487 8265

Morning Field Trip to Moores Bush, followed by afternoon cryptogam identification workshop. Moores Bush, in the upper Leith Valley, is the site of an on-going Forest and Bird restoration project, returning what was once dairy pasture to native forest. Their main emphasis now is in creating a mammal-free 'mini-mainland island' to aid the regeneration of podocarps. Miro, matai, totara, kahikatea and mountain cedar are all present, with some magnificent specimens towering above the vigorously regenerating under-story. Our main aim will be to help update the lichen, bryophyte and fern lists. Cryptogam (non-flowering plants) specimens needing identification will be brought back to the laboratory for the afternoon workshop in the Botany Dept. Lichen leaders Allison Knight and Jennifer Bannister, mosses - Maia Mistral. Leave Botany car park at 9:30 AM. Bring hand lens and lunch.

A walk in the (paleo) woods

Wednesday 19th of May 2004, 05:20 PM (15 years ago)

Contact: Ian Radford | ian.radford@botany.otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 9065

Don't miss this fascinating glimpse into the past. A walk in the (paleo) woods: leaves, bark, ferns and epiphyllous fungi in the 40 million year old Pikopiko fossil forest. Presented by paleobotanists Daphne Lee and award-winning Jennifer Bannister. Fossil forests are rare in New Zealand. The best known South Island example is the Jurassic forest at Curio Bay. This talk will describe the Pikopiko fossil forest, which has trees still spaced in life position exposed on the east bank of the Waiau River, near Tuatapere, Southland. At the NEW Zoology Benham Building, 346 Great King Street, behind the Zoology car park by the Captain Cook Hotel. Use the main entrance of the Benham Building to get in and go to the Benham Seminar Room, Rm. 215, 2nd floor. Please be prompt as we have to hold the door open.

Waipori Forest fungal foray

Saturday 1st of May 2004, 08:00 AM (15 years ago)

Contact: David Orlovich | david.orlovich@otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 9060

Trip to Waipori Forest to collect fungi with David Orlovich. (Note: collecting fungi is subject to approval by DoC). Of interest is a new fungus that has only been collected once in the Waipori area. Further collections will make the description of a new species possible. Bring hand lens, small basket or bag for collecting fungi, greaseproof paper (for wrapping specimens in the field). Leave 8 AM and return to the Department of Botany around lunch time. Afternoon in the laboratory examining specimens and recording details for herbarium collections.

AGM and talk: Gardens without weeds.

Wednesday 21st of April 2004, 05:20 PM (15 years ago)

Contact: Ian Radford | ian.radford@botany.otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 9065

Guest speaker Associate Professor Helen Leach, an anthropologist with a special interest in palaeoethnobotany. When Dr Monkhouse described Maori gardens seen in 1769 as "completely cleared of all weeds", did he mean that the gardeners were fastidious weeders, or were there just fewer weeds to eradicate? Did the Maori and other Polynesian peoples have a concept of weeds equivalent to that in European languages? This talk will look at indigenous plants that might have invaded Maori gardens, the inadvertent introduction of a small number of fellow travelers with Maori cultigens, and how different groups of Polynesians might have classified the plants that we call 'weeds'. At the NEW Zoology Benham Building, 346 Great King Street, behind the Zoology car park by the Captain Cook Hotel. Use the main entrance of the Benham Building to get in and go to the Benham Seminar Room, Rm. 215, 2nd floor. Please be prompt as we have to hold the door open.

Rock and Pillar Range field trip

Saturday 3rd of April 2004, 09:00 AM (15 years ago)

Contact: Allison Knight | alli_knight@hotmail.com | 027 487 8265

Full day or weekend field trip to the Rock and Pillar Range with alpine research botanists and ecologists. For the fit there is the option of a 3-4 hr walk up through changing vegetation zones from lowland pasture/tussock/scrub, through subalpine tussock with regenerating Hebe right up to Celmisia-dominated alpine herb fields and lichen-rich cushion fields. On-going botanical and ecological research has been based in this area for over 50 years, often using the Otago Tramping and Mountaineering Club hut, 'Leaning Lodge' as a base and refuge. See www.botany.otago.ac.nz/alpine/. There's an opportunity for those keen to extend their appreciation of the alpine flora to stay overnight, in this classic old ex-ski hut, which has been marked for destruction by DoC. Warm clothing and footwear for wet, windy conditions are advisable whatever the weather forecast. High wheel base 4WD advisable for those not walking. Some seats may be available. Contact Robyn Bridges, 479 8244 (day) if you wish to stay overnight (numbers limited).

Field trip to the Blue Mountains with Alan Mark

Saturday 13th of March 2004, 08:15 AM (15 years ago)

Contact: Ian Radford | ian.radford@botany.otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 9065

The Blue Mountains, although strongly modified on its lower slopes by exotic forestry, has good road access on to the summit ridge and even to its highest point at 998 m, giving easy access to a range of vegetation types, notably cushion bogs and mixed narrow-leaved snow tussock-shrubland, plus remains of a Halocarpus (bog pine) woodland exposed in eroding peat beds, all quite reminiscent of Maungatua. Its flora is also very similar but there are a few extras on the 'Bluies', notably Astelia linearis. Subalpine silver beech forest and its natural treeline at 950 m are also readily accessible. I suggested this trip as an alternative to Maungatua, given its easier (and more reliable) access. Note, however that there are some steep sections and it is advisable to take vehicles capable of handling rough terrain. It has been much less studied than Maungatua but was included by Stephan Halloy in his comparative study of alpine plant morphology (J. Veg. Sci. 1: 291-304. 1990: J. Roy. Soc. NZ 26: 41-78: 1996). Warm clothing and footwear for wet conditions are advisable whatever the weather forecast.

The All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory being carried out in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Monday 8th of March 2004, 05:20 PM (15 years ago)

Contact: David Orlovich | david.orlovich@otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 9060

A talk by Steve Stephenson, Research Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Arkansas. Steve has recently completed a volume in the Fungi of New Zealand series on plasmodial slime moulds (myxomycetes). He has been surveying mycetozoans (protostelids and dictyostelids as well as myxomycetes) as one component of an all taxa biodiversity inventory (ATBI) of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The ATBI of the Great Smoky Mountain National Park in the US has resulted in the discovery of 136 species new to science, in the Park, and an additional 1,436 that are known species, but which have not been previously identified as occurring in the In addition there is much new information on the geographic distribution of thousands of species, important for maps of species distribution. The inventory, coordinated by a support group called Discover Life in America, is conducted by scientists, student volunteers and others from all over the United States. See this article from the Smithsonian Institute for more background information. At the NEW Zoology Benham Building, 346 Great King Street, behind the Zoology car park by the Captain Cook Hotel. Use the main entrance of the Benham Building to get in and go to the Benham Seminar Room, Rm. 215, 2nd floor. Please be prompt as we have to hold the door open.

Closing date for Audrey Eagle Prize for Botanical Drawing

Monday 8th of March 2004, 12:00 AM (15 years ago)

Contact: Allison Knight | alli_knight@hotmail.com | 027 487 8265

Entries may be given to Audrey to take home for judging at our evening meeting on 8 March. Any medium is permitted, colour or black and white. The main criterion is that it has a botanical theme. Audrey suggests that something that has not been fully illustrated yet, like a small herbaceous plant, a lichen or a liverwort would be of added botanical interest. The president would love to have colour pictures to feature on our website, the committee is keen to have something we can use as a logo or letterhead, while the editor will be delighted to have original art to feature in the BSO newsletter, especially if there is an interesting note to go with it. (Bear in mind that the newsletter is set out in 14 pt font on A4 pages, which are photocopy-reduced to A5 for publishing in black and white.)

Start of Semester BSO BBQ!

Friday 5th of March 2004, 12:00 PM (15 years ago)

Contact: David Orlovich | david.orlovich@otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 9060

A BBQ to welcome new botany/ecology students and new BSO members. On the front lawn, Botany House Annexe, Great King Street (across the road from the Caltex). Sausage sandwiches and juice $1 each. All BSO members welcome!

Drawing from Nature - Botanic Illustration

Thursday 19th of February 2004, 05:00 PM (15 years ago)

Contact: Cleveland Living Arts Centre | cleve.artcentre@actrix.co.nz | (03) 477 7291

Eight week course Tutor: Monica Peters will encourage participants to explore different methods of representation by considering ways that plants have beed depicted throughout history, and will intoduce various drawing, watercolour and acrylic techniques for botanical illustration. The class will be suitable for beginners as well as those with some experience. Thursday 7-9 PM, February 19 - April 8.

$120 includes GST and some materials to enroll, please contact:

Cleveland Living Arts Centre
First Floor, Dunedin Railway Station
PO Box 5786, Dunedin

Nature conservation and grazing management in Europe and New Zealand

Wednesday 18th of February 2004, 05:20 PM (15 years ago)

Contact: Ian Radford | ian.radford@botany.otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 9065

A talk by Dr Jan Bokdam, Nature Conservation and Plant Ecology Group, Wageningen, The Netherlands. Dr Bokdam's research interests include: Plant-herbivore interactions, especially between vascular plants and herbivorous mammals; Defensive and exploitative adaptations of plants to herbivores; Consequences of co-evolution for coexistence, survival and extinction; Effects of herbivores on plant processes, successional pathways and mosaics; Implementation of plant-herbivore interactions in conservation management strategies; Consequences of incompleteness and over-completeness of the herbivore assemblage and abiotic catena on habitat use, vegetation succession and biodiversity; Maintenance, restoration, substitution and mitigation as elements of conservation management schemes. At the NEW Zoology Benham Building, 346 Great King Street, behind the Zoology car park by the Captain Cook Hotel. Use the main entrance of the Benham Building to get in and go to the Benham Seminar Room, Rm. 215, 2nd floor. Please be prompt as we have to hold the door open.