Past Events

Botany and wildlife of Macauley Island, Southern Kermadecs.

Wednesday 16th of May 2007, 05:20 PM (15 years ago)

Contact: Kevin Gould | kevin.gould@botany.otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 9061

Talk by John Barkla, DOC. John will tell us about his recent trip to the seldom visited Macauley Island, 1000 km north-east of the Northland coast. Just getting there was an adventure in itself! The island's vegetation has undergone a huge transformation since goats were removed in 1970. On this trip an operation to rid the island of rats was also carried out. At the Zoology Benham Building, 346 Great King Street, behind the Zoology car park by the Captain Cook Hotel. Use the main entrance of the Benham Building to get in and go to the Benham Seminar Room, Rm. 215, 2nd floor. Please be prompt as we have to hold the door open.

An evening of Botanical Photography and AGM

Wednesday 18th of April 2007, 05:20 PM (15 years ago)

Contact: Kevin Gould | kevin.gould@botany.otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 9061

Renowned photographers Rod Morris, Peter Johnson and Kelvin Lloyd will judge the inaugural BSO photographic competition following a brief AGM. Entries will be on display, photographic tips given and prizes presented. It's not too late to enter. Entries close 30 March. See BSO website or notice board for entry forms. At the Zoology Benham Building, 346 Great King Street, behind the Zoology car park by the Captain Cook Hotel. Use the main entrance of the Benham Building to get in and go to the Benham Seminar Room, Rm. 215, 2nd floor. Please be prompt as we have to hold the door open.

Field trip to the DOC reserve at Nenthorn/Macraes.

Sunday 15th of April 2007, 08:30 AM (15 years ago)

Contact: Mike Thorsen | mike.esr@xtra.co.nz | (03) 453 6800

Nenthorn/Macraes (inland from Palmerston) is best known as a site for rare skink conservation but there is also great botanical diversity, including over 25 threatened plants. It's a landscape of rolling tussockland dotted with lichen encrusted schist rock outcrops, shallow ephemeral wetlands, and the odd deep gully with shrubby remnants. We'll seek out some of the less familiar species and should encounter coral broom, wetland herbs such as Gratiola nana and Tetrachondra hamiltonii, and the rare grass Simplicia laxa. Leave Botany carpark at 8.30 am Sunday and return around 6 pm. Bring lunch and be prepared for cool changeable weather conditions. The mileage for this trip is expected to be about 100 km. Students are encouraged to apply for the student subsidy for this trip (download form at the Botanical Society of Otago website.).

The invisible world of floral odours: How plants attract, manipulate and deceive flower visitors

Wednesday 21st of March 2007, 01:00 PM (16 years ago)

Contact: Trish Fleming | trish.fleming@botany.otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 7577

Talk by Dr Andreas Jurgens, Marsden Postdoc, HortResearch and Landcare Research Lincoln, New Zealand. Botany Department Seminar. Many plant species need insects as pollen vectors and floral characters are interpreted as adaptations to the most effective pollinators. Floral odours are found in the vast majority of flowering plants and they play an important role in plant-pollinator interactions. From a plant's perspective volatiles are used to attract, manipulate and even deceit flower visitors for the purpose of pollination. I will illustrate the role of floral volatiles with examples from different plant families that are associated with specific pollinator groups such as the Annonaceae (beetles), Asclepiadaceae (flies), Caryophyllaceae (moths), Ranunculaceae (bees). Some tropical Annonaceae flowers look like fruits and have a fruity aroma to attract small beetles. Stapeliad flowers (Asclepidaceae) emit a noticeable strong and fetid scent resembling that of carrion, urine or dung to attract flies - sometimes without offering any food. In moth-pollinated Silene species (Caryophyllaceae) with pleasant, perfume like odours we find a fine tuned system in which the time of odour emission as well as spatial patterns of the volatiles from a single flower guides flower visitors to the nectar source. In the buttercup family (Ranunculaceae) genera-specific pollen odour patterns may explain the association with pollen-specific bees. Union Street Lecture Theatre, (following the seminar by Dana Dudle at 12 noon).

Maintaining females in gynodioecious populations in Lobelia siphilitica

Wednesday 21st of March 2007, 12:00 PM (16 years ago)

Contact: Trish Fleming | trish.fleming@botany.otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 7577

Genetic, ecological and morphological factors. A talk by Dr Dana Dudle, Biology, DePauw University, Indiana, USA. Union Street Lecture Theatre (upstairs)

Life on the rocks: Research and restoration in Limestone Glades and Abandoned quarries.

Wednesday 14th of March 2007, 05:20 PM (16 years ago)

Contact: Kevin Gould | kevin.gould@botany.otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 9061

Talk by Dana Dudle, DePauw University. The 'limestone belt' in the southern part of Indiana is home to hundreds of abandoned quarries as well as rare ecosystems such as limestone glades. Using a quarry near DePauw's campus as a model I will explore opportunities for research and possible establishment of glade-like communities on abandoned quarries. At the Zoology Benham Building, 346 Great King Street, behind the Zoology car park by the Captain Cook Hotel. Use the main entrance of the Benham Building to get in and go to the Benham Seminar Room, Rm. 215, 2nd floor. Please be prompt as we have to hold the door open.

Maungatua Scenic Reserve

Saturday 10th of March 2007, 08:30 AM (16 years ago)

Contact: Robyn Bridges | 021 235 8997

Mt Maungatua rises strikingly above the Taieri Plain. Once it was mostly covered in forest, but this was largely lost around 1300 - 1400 AD and has not re-established. In its place on the upper slopes are snow tussock grasslands in the west and mixed snow tussock-scrub in the east. A few stands of silver beech, Nothofagus menziesii, persist on the most sheltered sites of the western slopes, and it is in most gullies on the moister eastern slopes with mixed podocarps and beech in the larger gullies (Lee Ck and Mill Ck-Waipori Gorge) at either end of the range. On the summit plateau are subalpine scrub dominated by Dracophyllum longifolium, depressions with herb/moor communities, tarns and lichen-rich bogs and tors. Leader: Emeritus Prof. Alan Mark has established permanent plots to monitor change and will have handouts and plant lists available. Rain-date Sunday 11 March. 4WD helpful. Bring warm, windproof clothes.

Why study pollen?

Wednesday 7th of March 2007, 01:00 PM (16 years ago)

Contact: Trish Fleming | trish.fleming@botany.otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 7577

A talk by Professor David Ferguson (William Evans Fellow), Director of Department of Paleontology, University of Vienna, Austria. Union Street Lecture Theatre (upstairs)

Coral reefs and their loss: Why it matters

Wednesday 7th of March 2007, 12:00 PM (16 years ago)

Contact: Trish Fleming | trish.fleming@botany.otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 7577

A talk by Professor Mark Hixon (William Evans Fellow), Department of Zoology, Oregon State University, USA. Union Street Lecture Theatre (upstairs)

Free BSO BBQ

Friday 2nd of March 2007, 12:00 PM (16 years ago)

Contact: David Orlovich | david.orlovich@otago.ac.nz

BBQ to welcome new botany/ecology students and new BSO members. At the front lawn, Botany House Annex, Great King Street (across the road from the main Botany building). Sausage sandwiches and drinks provided free by the Botanical Society of Otago. All BSO members welcome!

Dynamics and regulation of marine fish populations at multiple scales

Wednesday 28th of February 2007, 12:00 PM (16 years ago)

Contact: Trish Fleming | trish.fleming@botany.otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 7577

A talk by Professor Mark Hixon (William Evans Fellow), Department of Zoology, Oregon State University, USA. Union Street Lecture Theatre (upstairs)

Global warming and YOU: What every citizen should know

Tuesday 27th of February 2007, 05:30 PM (16 years ago)

Contact: Trish Fleming | trish.fleming@botany.otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 7577

A talk by Professor Mark Hixon (William Evans Fellow), Department of Zoology, Oregon State University, USA. Archway 4 Public Lecture Theatre

Plants and animals from a Miocene Maar lake in China

Tuesday 27th of February 2007, 01:00 PM (16 years ago)

Contact: Daphne Lee | daphne.lee@stonebow.otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 7525

A talk by Professor David Ferguson (William Evans Fellow), Director of Department of Paleontology, University of Vienna, Austria. In the Geology Dept Common Room

Radical environmental change on Whangapoua Estuary, Great Barrier Island in 3500 years

Wednesday 21st of February 2007, 05:20 PM (16 years ago)

Contact: Kevin Gould | kevin.gould@botany.otago.ac.nz | (03) 479 9061

A talk by Dr Yanbin Deng, Otago Archeological Research Cluster, Dept of Anthropology, University of Otago. A vegetation history and environment change from pollen reconstructions will be presented. A linear sequence of vegetation communities beginning with mangroves and followed by estuarine marsh communities composed of Juncus kraussii, Leptocarpus similis, and Baumea juncea was recognised in almost all pollen diagrams. Further transitions, from Baumea to a terrestrial system of Leptospermum shrubland or Cordyline/Dacrycarpus swamp forest, followed two main pathways associated with autogenic accumulation of peat and terrigenous sediment input respectively. Natural and human disturbances drive sedimentation rates, and interact with autogenic factors, to dictate vegetation transitions in these later stages. The intensive impact (mainly burning) during Polynesian times had a much greater effect on estuary than the pre-Polynesian natural processes, greatly accelerating plant succession. At the Zoology Benham Building, 346 Great King Street, behind the Zoology car park by the Captain Cook Hotel. Use the main entrance of the Benham Building to get in and go to the Benham Seminar Room, Rm. 215, 2nd floor. Please be prompt as we have to hold the door open.

End of year dinner

Monday 11th of December 2006, 07:30 PM (16 years ago)

Contact: Robyn Bridges | 021 235 8997

End of year dinner at the Asian Chinese Restaurant (43 Moray Place) following Adrienne's talk. RSVP to Robyn Bridges (robyn.bridges@otago.ac.nz) by 8 December